dVerse, poetry

dVerse Haiku Sequence a Poem!

dVerse inspired

Is That You, Lord!

Passing by the Church
Come! a voice seemed to whisper
Me myself with God!

Tiptoeing alone
Pausing at giant statues                                    Image1
Walking to and fro.

Faces fixed in place
I can almost hear them speak
staring long enough.

Candles flickering
Shadows dancing; is that You?
Marbled eyes peering!

Word of the Day Challenge

It’s a GRACE! LISTEN!

All about GRACE!

Painting
Hail Mary FULL OF GRACE

 

Did you know that “grace,” “gracias,” and “Grazie” all descend from the same Latin word, “grātia”?!
Grace is the Prompt word today via “Word of the Day Challenge.”
In my world, a word I use regularly. This post will reflect on what sense of the word I mean since the definition varies.

Grace is a gift from God! Pure and simple.

Ave Maria, gratia plena meaning Hail Mary FULL OF GRACE.

Ah! Another Challenge, Word Prompts

An Explanation— Gift

Eugi’s Weekly Prompt –Identity – July 13, 2020

One day while I minded my own business, a couple of men tried to stump me. I knew by the tone of their voice what they intended. It so happened and unknown to me, my scapular was hanging out from beneath my outer garment—those who do not know a scapular, a blessed religious article sacred to Traditional Catholics.
They heckled and said,
“do you really believe that piece of cloth will save you”?
“No,” I said, “it is my identity.”
I continued to explain how an officer wears a badge, or others might wear a logo to identify themself.
To wear a Cross or medal is not superstitious as many WANT to believe; it means merely we identify ourselves with Jesus, Mary His Mother, who was with Him from His conception till His death. Now that is worth in which to identify for those who believe.scapular

poetry, Word Prompts

Worth waiting for in POETRY

Let’s have a look-see at the paint chips because its time to paint,  our CHIPS can be viewed below.

       *************

 

Pining away thoughts of future
Reflection through a looking glass.
The other side of life appeared.

Seeing Heaven a perfect place
Worth waiting for STOP return, don’t
Look back— forget Disco fever!

Seek toward that field of poppies
A nursery, tulips in spring
Follow the scent of sweet Iris.

Ah! Another Challenge, dVerse, poetry

His Masterpiece

DressedInBlue

Looking down into the Grand Canyon is scary indeed!
Looking up into the Niagara Falls, the Power of God!
I see His aura surrounding Him among His creations;
Totality gathers around His masterpiece, His mother!
Created especially for her role.
I think of her as my wishing well
With an antique rose in her hair
Upon it, a tiny dewdrop.
Without her, only a foggy harbor.

Prompt 

dVerse

Supernatural Reality

Today Begins …

LENT

Today, Ash Wed., we begin the Season of Lent. The Church reminds us of what we should be doing every day (Penance), not only during Lent. Yet, we have this Holy Season to ponder. The teaching we find in the Gospels, Jesus spent 40 days of fasting, giving us an example. Thereby we too fast in preparation for His Resurrection, proving to the entire world that He, Jesus Christ, is truly God.

It pleases God when we assist Him in carrying His Cross, although He does not need anything from us. He gave us an example when Simon of Cyrene was allowed by Christ to assist in the carrying of His Cross.

When and by whom was the season of Lent instituted?

Footsteps

Many of the early Fathers of the Church, in particular, St. Jerome, Pope St. Leo the Great, St. Cyril of Alexandria, and St. Isidore of Seville, confirm that the season of Lent was instituted by the Apostles themselves from the very commencement of the Church. They legislated a universal fast for the ever-growing flock of Christ to serve as a spiritual preparation for Our Lord’s Resurrection from the dead. The Apostles determined that, as the number forty (40) was a very significant number both in the Old and New Testaments, this solemn penitential season should also consist of 40 days.        http://www.cmri.org/96prog2.htm

Supernatural Reality

What is Christian culture?

 John Senior writes:

What is Christian culture? It is essentially the Mass. That is not my or anyone’s opinion or theory or wish but the central fact of 2,000 years of history. Christendom, what secularists call Western Civilization, is the Mass and the paraphernalia which protect and facilitate it. All architecture, art, political and social forms, economics, the way people live and feel and think, music, literature ― all these things, when they are right, are ways of fostering and protecting the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

To enact a sacrifice, there must be an altar, an altar has to have a roof over it in case it rains; to reserve the Blessed Sacrament, we build a little House of Gold and over it a Tower of Ivory with a bell and a garden round it with the roses and lilies of purity, emblems of the Virgin Mary ― Rosa MysticaTurris Davidica, Turris Eburnea, Domus Aurea, who carried His Body and His Blood in her womb, Body of her body, Blood of her blood. And around the church and garden, where we bury the faithful dead, the caretakers live, the priests and religious whose work is prayer, who keep the Mystery of Faith in its tabernacle of music and words in the Office of the Church; and around them, the faithful who gather to worship and divide the other work that must be done in order to make the perpetuation of the Sacrifice possible — to raise the food and make the clothes and build and keep the peace so that generations to come may live for Him, so that the Sacrifice goes on even until the consummation of the world.

Also read this by Peter Kwasniewski

An ugly “church” represents the loss of this fundamental contemplative insight into the beauty of the world and the need to bring all things in sacrifice before the God who is Beauty itself.

Catholics have a sacred right, owing to their baptism into the glorified Jesus Christ, to the full expression of their faith within the liturgy and through all the arts that embellish and support it; they have a right to free access to the glories of Tradition, which have been cherished and handed down for centuries and must be cherished and handed down until the end of time.

Corresponding to this right is, as always, a duty. Catholics have a duty to preserve, cherish, and perpetuate this Tradition; they have a responsibility to come to know it and love it more and more over their lifetimes. We are not to sit back and wait until someone brings us beauty on a platter; we are to work on beautifying our interior life through prayer, our external life through manners, ongoing education, and cultural pursuits; we are to support the Church’s ministers with our prayers, our resources, our petitions, so that the riches of Tradition may flourish again in our times.

What God gives us is not just the “here and now,” but the faith and love of generations who have come before us, embodied in countless treasures of music, painting, sculpture, architecture, and writing, destined for the edification of souls until the end of time.

All of this has been given to us, in proportion to our capacities, positions, opportunities for action. We are the path by which tradition will reach, or not reach, our descendants. Much today depends on lay involvement, as Vatican II predicted. This can go in a good direction, as when Catholics respectfully ask their pastors to provide the traditional Latin Mass; or it can go in a bad direction, as when laity attempt to run the show, taking over responsibilities that belong to the clergy.  Lay people who are humbly, cheerfully, and generously devoted to the spread of Christian culture, centered on the Mass and surrounded on all sides with the beauty that befits it, have been and will continue to be a major factor in the longed-for renewal of the Church.

Every Catholic who enters a church should be able to find figures of Christ and the Saints, as well as an elevated sanctuary, set apart and beautifully furnished, with the altar and the tabernacle in a prominent place and suitably decorated. Catholics have a right to the full, authentic expression of their faith, both in the liturgy and in the arts that embellish it, especially sacred music. And as I never tire of saying, Catholics have a duty to embrace this fullness, to become acquainted with it, and to cherish it.