Mindlovesmisery's

Who Are You To Say!

Sunday Confessionals : Answers

WHO ARE YOU TO SAY!

I wonder — can we agree?
Can we all just get along?
The world happier would be!
Maybe I might/could be wrong!

Must I always do as you?
Possibly I might be right!
I trust my thoughts also true —
And I believe white is white!

If you so dislike my voice
Simply turn and dance away!
Agree that all have a choice.
Then our world will be okay!

Daily Spur, Lucky Dip, Mindlovesmisery's, Saturday Mix

How Would I Know!

For this week’s Lucky Dip, says she reached into her mystery bag and pulled out a Didactic Poem – What! You say what is that? Didactic Poetry is a form of poetry intended for instruction such as for knowledge or to teach.

My attempt is seen below; I wrote it with five-syllable ease-to-flow lines. Titled; FAITH

Do you know — I do!
How does God answer?
How do I know this
His Church tells me so!

Through His suffering
Merits fill the brim
Treasury the Church
His Church —always true.

Almighty Supreme
Great God could have winked!
To save us all —Yet!
Would you have cared? — No!

His torture —The Price.
His wealth — eternal.
Waits for you to draw
From His treasury!

A Divine merit
Never-ending, FREE!
His merits circling
Over and beyond!

His worth forever.
Whirls the world; passion
Infinite!  Complete
Please ask to receive.


Word Prompt is “GREAT”

#LuckyDip

RDP, W3

Sun and Moon; BOTH!

W3 is a weekly poem prompt the details 

found HERE!  Thank you SkepticsKaddish 

The Sun and Moon both created
Not without a thought; from whom?
As the believer sees;  One God high,
Yet, He shines throughout.

The Moon lurks in darkness; as does
The doubter.  The Moon glows beguiling
Inviting all.  While God waits? 
God marks time, our time!
  
Morning the Sun rises. 
The Moon sleeps!
Another day, God waits!
A ray; His ray to shine on us!
WDYS

Try something NEW; a Monoku

Eugenia …. suggests a Monoku a type of poem which is made up of a single horizontal line. Traditionally considered as a haiku writing, it is currently accepted as a variant of the haiku form of poetry. Monoku emerged as an independent style of poetry in the 1970s.

Unlike the Haiku which is made up of three outlines with a total of seventeen syllables, Monoku features a single line consisting of seventeen syllables or even fewer.

It contains a pause brought about by speech rhythm with slight or no punctuation. The first letter should not be capitalized – but instead written in lower case.

****

I’ll try the above form written for WDYS click here to join

Prompt image below

peek-a-boo I love you but you know I do so true I do — I do

Word of the Day Challenge

Poem — The Wind does blow

First, lock us up with a new plague!
Grounding!
The price of gas is what?  They say!
Grounded again!
Close the churches; they just might pray
Locked!
The world looks suddenly so vague!
Started with forbidding to pray.
Almighty Powerful God; out!
Ground them who refuse to obey
Everything must now be our way.
These radicals all-day long tout
Our way or no way we convey!
Yet, the wind does blow today.
Remember the end, the story.
Forget not our flag, Old Glory.
God brings His enemies to naught.
His perfect timing, we are taught.




#W.O.T.D.

Mindlovesmisery's, Photo Challenge

A Poem Without thought

Just a little simple poem with no particular form composed quickly while looking at the photo challenge below. A Free Versed Poem.

All alone, it may seem
Yet, like living, things may be seen
Lonely, we forget that heavenly stream
All alone, it may seem

Ah! Another Challenge, Whatsoever IS

Prompt for the Letter “B”

Try this prompt, its fun click here to participate HERE

Backyard—Beehive—Brave—Beautiful—Buzzing—Bees

Years ago I did a series of drawings/paintings of bees, which I put into a story for my grandchildren; which was inspired by these bumblebees living in my garden at that time.

Today the prompt is for the LETTER ‘B’. Please be kind to my creation I humbly show off along with the suggested rules from the prompt; Place, Emotion, Adjective, Verb, and animal/insect as seen below the above image.

Backyard beauties birds 
 and Bees buzzing cheerfully
All brave and busy
All-day long
 doing what they are 
Created to do
Praising God and mankind too!

What can be more lovely than a bumblebee, I submit my image for WhatSoEver is Lovely

Photo Challenge

#WritePhoto — Distance Calls!

Look out there and see
You are not alone
Off in the distance, see the light
It's there!
Just reach out!
Grasp!
Don't give up; stretch, reach across!
Deception keeps you apart —
Ignore that torrent!
A chimera an illusion
Delay NOT!
It's later than you think!



Distance – Image by KL Caley
For visually challenged writersthe image shows an island across a stretch of water. Upon which you can see some ruins and a white lighthouse.

#writephoto

Fandango, Weekly Prompt

Lines that rhyme two prompts in one post.

Two in One PromptS today the words are number ONE (1) MAVEN

and (2) OVERTHINKERS

Just a simple poem with seven syllables in each line and a little rhyme.

Commonsense not aplenty
At times my mind is empty!
Now again, I need a pro.
A Maven Someone that shows—
An overthinker, you know
With brains with tiny blinkers.
Speaking way over my head;
Do I follow what was said?
You tell them they are funny,
They think we are the dummy!
Their kind are easily smart
When puzzled, they press restart.

dVerse

ONL a Blackout Poem

Below is an interesting a poem different as explained. Posted again for dVerse ONL

My original posting can be found here — https://myforever.blog/2021/08/03/found-poetry-i-found-it/

A blackout poem begins with an existing text, usually a newspaper. The writer blots out most of the page using a heavy black marker. The remaining words are not moved or rearranged. Fixed in place, they float in a sea of darkness. The contrast of black and white stirs thoughts of censorship and secrecy. What’s hiding behind the headlines of our daily paper? What does the highlighted text reveal about politics and world events?

Redacting words to create a new work goes back centuries. Still, the process became trendy when writer and artist Austin Kleon posted newspaper blackout poems online and then published his book and companion blog, Newspaper Blackout.

Evocative and dramatic, blackout poems retain the original typography and word placement. Some artists add graphic designs, while others let the stark words stand independently.

WDYS

The Wonders of Thee!

My inspiration from the image presented below by one of my favorite bloggers at #Keepitalive

Look and see the wonders of Thee!
Your creations, a celestial star we call the Sun
Our gift — to give us what we need!
Your feathered friends graced with wings.
Sing and dance, surrounded by a painted sky
Oh, and so high! A child sees!
A child as to us created in your image —
To live forever with Thee!

#keepitalive

Tanka Tuesday by Colleen Chesbro

What is an Alphabet Haiku?

Today my challenge was to try something DIFFERENT. Again thinking about the Tanka Tuesday Challenge, Colleen suggested we use a form from Poets Collective, the link can be found on Colleen invitation page to participate here —> TankaT uesday

There on Poets Collective I took this challenge of writing in the form of Alphabet Haiku a Modern haiku form created by Beatrice Evans, aka Ronnica at AllpoetryIt requires only strict 5 7 5 syllable construction with all words beginning with the same letter.

The words to use synonyms only are Sanctuary and Follow.

Sense security
Seek shelter start speedily
Select search — support

Tanka Tuesday by Colleen Chesbro

Found Poetry, I found it!

This week because it’s the beginning of a new month!

Colleen Chesebro says, “This challenge is NOW a true poet’s choice! Use any poetry form that you’d like including free-style or prose poetry. If your form is something new, teach us how to write it. Have fun!

She suggested several forms, take a look here, CLICK!

I wanted to try as she suggested FOUND POETRY with there being several different methods, I choose the BLACK OUT! Using the Lord’s Prayer also know as The Our Father.

A blackout poem begins with an existing text, usually a newspaper. Using a heavy black marker, the writer blots out most of the page. The remaining words are not moved or rearranged. Fixed in place, they float in a sea of darkness. The contrast of black and white stirs thoughts of censorship and secrecy. What’s hiding behind the headlines of our daily paper? What does the highlighted text reveal about politics and world events?

The idea of redacting words to create a new work goes back centuries, but the process became trendy when writer and artist Austin Kleon posted newspaper blackout poems online and then published his book and companion blog, Newspaper Blackout.

Evocative and dramatic, blackout poems retain the original typography and word placement. Some artists add graphic designs, while others let the stark words stand on their own.

 

Photo Challenge

Only God can make a TREE – #TreeSquare

#treesquare challenge is still running till the end of the month. I remembered this photo I took and enhanced a few years back, thought I would share it here on my blog.

But First!

Joyce Kilmer’s poem “Only God can make a tree.”

I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.

A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast;

A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;

A tree that may in Summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;

Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.

Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.

If anyone seeing this ever is in Spokane, please don’t miss a trip to visit Mount St. Michael, a historic and beautiful treat for all. 

For a hundred years, Mount St. Michael has stood on a bluff overlooking the city. One day while walking around the park-like area, I noticed this ancient tree that seemed to be showing off a graceful twist. I could not help but capture its image forever with my camera; with the help of my photo editor, I added a bit of glamour with color and a graceful dancer to couple with the oversized tree growing there. 

Even the trees in the background seem to be dancing!

♫ ♫ ♪

poetry

Did Someone say BLUE?

Every time I hear the word BLUEhttps://traveltalk.me.uk/2021/07/04/life-in-colour-26/, I remember this childhood prayer I learned in school.

Lovely Lady dressed in blue ——-
Teach me how to pray!
God was just your little boy,
Tell me what to say!

Did you lift Him up, sometimes,
Gently on your knee?
Did you sing to Him the way
Mother does to me?

Did you hold His hand at night?
Did you ever try
Telling stories of the world?
O! And did He cry?

Do you really think He cares
If I tell Him things ——-
Little things that happen? And
Do the Angels WINGS

Make a noise? And can He hear
Me if I speak low?
Does He understand me now?
Tell me ——-for you know.

Lovely Lady dressed in blue ——-
Teach me how to pray!
God was just your little boy,
And you know the way.


BLUE

Tanka Tuesday by Colleen Chesbro

Reaching for God

It’s the third week of the month! Time for an Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt

Click for details

First the Photo Prompt seen below:

I see a hand reach
Cut off, but living
Stretch out to cosmos
Dull, muddled in sin!

The hand enfolds with
Hope, a sign Divine
Where art thou One God?
Rainbow of promise!

Could this be our end?
Or the beginning
I see a hand grasp
Cut off, but reaching!

My post is a simple verse with the syllabic count of 5 per line, speak from my heart!

dVerse

Repetition in Poetry — dVerse



Tell the story about the Village of Grace Land
Tell of a lady so graceful and lovely!

Okay, I will!

Do I tell, before taking her meals, she prayed grace.
I will tell you now how she walked with style and grace.
And did I tell you we started calling her Grace.
I should tell if anything she lacked — it wasn't grace.
I am telling you now even her tears fell with grace.
This beautiful girl we remember as Grace.
  

I don’t think I got this right; the use of repetition in poetry! Instructions were well over my skill grade. Yet, this morning I prayed for humility; with that said I think my prayer was answered. BIG TIME!

For complete directions, click here; I know you can do it!

Inspired by dVerse